9 Comments

    • Daniel Martin

      http://lmgtfy.com/?q=structural+racism+in+the+US

      But short version: mainly in home prices and property values, and in the patterns of inherited wealth tied to historic housing discrimination. E.g., when my grandmother died, she left us all a sum of money mostly generated by selling her house of 50 years a few years prior. When my grandparents bought that house, racial discrimination in housing financing and sales was very open, explicit, and legal. Therefore, all her (white) descendants get a little boost in inherited money that was accumulated in part by participation in a racially rigged system. Sure, such housing discrimination is now illegal (though with some evidence that it still happens), but the societal and multi-generational patterns that were constructed by an explicitly racist system don’t disappear overnight.

      • Philandering Bastard

        Thanks for the link 🙂
        So, how long after the end of racial discrimination do its effects last? One generation? Two generations? Forever?

  1. Seth MacLeod

    After reading some articles about that particular event, it’s still pretty difficult to know what really happened between the teacher and the students. It really could go either way, because of course the teacher is going to say she was explaining reasonably while the students will say they were unfairly singled out and whatnot.

    I know that from my experience at Boston University, professors did *not* actually bring up politics in classes where it was entirely irrelevant to the course material. I did take an English course on African American literature, but the professor handled everything entirely reasonably. Every school and even every professor is different, and I may have just been very lucky with my professors, but it certainly has not been my experience that professors like to waste class time on things that are irrelevant to the course material.

    I wonder how the professor, Shannon Gibney, presented her ideas to the class. If you skip the basics of any framework, it can be very easy for people to misinterpret what is being discussed. It’s too bad there really isn’t much being reported on how she presented ideas to the class. It’s just become a he said, she said type of situation.

    P.S. Wow most of the comments on your article at the Daily Caller are awful. I’ll be sure to never comment on there.

    • To me, the specs don’t really matter. Don’t report a professor for harassment for teaching something you don’t like. But I guess it would be interesting to know. And yeah, apparently I’m “cuntish,” haha. Have you ever seen Ask A Daily Caller Commenter? Hilar.

      • Seth MacLeod

        It seems pretty absurd that they reported her for harassment. She’s been teaching there for years without students reporting her, so it’s very unlikely that she’s actively harassing students. I’m just curious about how she presents her ideas because presentation really can be far more influential than the content of the message. It doesn’t seem like these guys were interested either way, so it was only a matter of time before they reported somebody; it just happened to be her.

        “Dear Aunt,

        This comment has been flagged for review.”

        Perfect.

    • iamcuriousblue

      I know that from my experience at Boston University, professors did *not* actually bring up politics in classes where it was entirely irrelevant to the course material. I did take an English course on African American literature, but the professor handled everything entirely reasonably. Every school and even every professor is different, and I may have just been very lucky with my professors, but it certainly has not been my experience that professors like to waste class time on things that are irrelevant to the course material.”

      I’ve had it happen in classes I’ve taken – a prof at City College of SF teaching a *photography* class taking class time to rant about Bush. On one hand, I was never a fan of Dubya, so I didn’t disagree with her, nor do I think profs have to keep their opinions hidden, but I did (and still) feel that this kind of off-topic editorializing was out of line. Then again, I’m in the SF Bay Area, where people can be incredibly smug about their politics under the idea that makes them “outspoken”.

      • Seth MacLeod

        I had the same general experience in high school. Many teachers there would go on political tangents. I was sure I was going to experience the same thing in college, so that’s why I was so surprised to only have professors that wanted to focus on the course material. I probably got lucky with my professors, as I’m sure there are professors at BU that will talk about politics during class.

  2. Alantar

    I agree with the author. I don’t know whether the professor or the students were right – or even if all of them were wrong. I don’t even need to know. Speech restrictions don’t solve anything – they just hide problems and let them fester. Such restrictions force those with well-grounded concerns to share an ideological space with bigots and cranks, which results in an unfair smearing of the one and a dangerous new tolerance for the other – precisely because intelligent people understand that the two groups are not the same but are deprived of the tools to tell the difference.

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